Rainbowfish Forum Forum Index
support and discussion forum for Rainbows
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

M. maccullochi 'Skull Creek'
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rainbowfish Forum Forum Index -> New Acquisitions
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
andtap



Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Four forms are shown on my website:

http://rainbowfish.angfaqld.org.au/Maccull.htm

This is a form from Papua New Guinea, location unknown?


http://s11.postimg.org/t8v4sm6f7/M_maccullochi_PNG_NA.jpg

Adrian
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
andtap



Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a little bit more information on the Melanotaenia maccullochi forms (species)

This is information I got from Peter Unmack a few years back, so it might be out of date.

"Genetic data separate Melanotaenia maccullochi into three groups, Burtons Creek, Etty Bay and Cape York populations. More populations along the eastern drainages need to be examined to determine further genetic variation."

Burton Creek is the populations from the Northern Territory. The Etty Bay form would be my "Cairns to Cardwell" group. I think there are at least two different species on Cape York - the Jardine River and its tributaries, and the rest of Cape York that include the eastern rivers and their tributaries. Plus the ones from the sand dunes region may be different again. Then we have the New Guinea forms of which very few collections have taken place. In fact, there are a lot of locations that have never been collected, or those that have and the specimens from these locations have not been examined genetically.

We could end up with Melanotaenia maccullochi being split into about 5 species?

Just like the "goldiei group" recently.

Adrian
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ekona



Joined: 13 Jun 2009
Posts: 245

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

andtap wrote:

...In fact, there are a lot of locations that have never been collected... Adrian

That is an interesting thing to consider. I've often thought that most of the area had been explored by naturalists and /or tropical fish (rainbow) collectors and that there was really nothing new to discover in QLD. However, after watching videos of folks transversing some of the tracks in the Jardine River catchment, it becomes quite clear just how it would be possible ,and even almost a certainty, that vast areas, in which potentially there could exist quite different variations or even new species of rainbow, have yet to be explored and sampled. I cannot believe some of the several meter deep 'potholes' with almost vertical 'walls' that folks will drive through while traveling in the wilds of QLD. Doing so would be quite an adventure!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
andtap



Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ekona wrote:
andtap wrote:

...In fact, there are a lot of locations that have never been collected... Adrian

That is an interesting thing to consider. I've often thought that most of the area had been explored by naturalists and /or tropical fish (rainbow) collectors and that there was really nothing new to discover in QLD. However, after watching videos of folks transversing some of the tracks in the Jardine River catchment, it becomes quite clear just how it would be possible ,and even almost a certainty, that vast areas, in which potentially there could exist quite different variations or even new species of rainbow, have yet to be explored and sampled. I cannot believe some of the several meter deep 'potholes' with almost vertical 'walls' that folks will drive through while traveling in the wilds of QLD. Doing so would be quite an adventure!


http://postimg.org/image/jdstwmcrt/

Most of northern Australia has never been systematically surveyed for freshwater species. Not only rainbowfishes but turtles, crayfish, crabs, aquatic plants etc, etc.

Most rainbowfishes have been collected mainly from river crossings where there is access. However, it is often in their upper tributaries where you find most fish species. Look how long it took to find I. werneri in Australia. It was found in New Guinea first.

The problem is there is just no access to most of the river systems in northern Australia. You would have to hire a helicopter to collect from some of the rivers. Also, there has never been any money available for this type of research. Most of the known species were originally collected by hobbyists, not scientific personel.

Then you get regions like the above aerial image, which would be good Melanotaenia maccullochi habitat, and its never been collected because there is no access.

Adrian
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mikev



Joined: 19 Feb 2009
Posts: 8796
Location: NYC

PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not just Australia.... they keep on finding new darter species in the US ... and notice that darters are all found in the Eastern US, which is generally accessible!

This makes me wonder if anyone/anywhere ever made an effort to explore some area entirely.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rainbowfish Forum Forum Index -> New Acquisitions All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group :: Hosted by DSDhosting